How to collect pop music from down under, part six: the hip-hop course

It was inevitable that hip-hop would be bubbling under in Australia, as it had around the world. As with most music movements down under, hip-hop there also took a nudge from its popularity in the United States and the United Kingdom in the 1980s. But here, it took just a little bit longer. We’ve talked for the past few weeks about how the development of Australian music centered around bands performing in local venues, and how they grew after some sort of national infrastructure – critical support on radio and TV – was locked into place. Well, that infrastructure got complacent for a while – then again, the 80s were big for many of these bands – and hip-hop barely got a look-in, even by the time the 1990s came in and tastes were starting to shift all over.

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How to collect pop music from down under, part five: the dance course

Australians love to have a good time, or so the stereotype goes. Musically, it shows, with a lot of dance acts – DJs, producers, everyone else in between – making lots of waves, with some lucky enough to sneak out of the country and make it big globally. But since the development of Aussie pop music centered mostly on rock and pop, it took a while for the electronic scene to break through to the mainstream and become an essential part of the landscape – well, essential enough to make me feel old, because this never really was the music of my youth. But soldier on we must.

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How to collect pop music from down under, part four: the indie course

This is when I will admit, upfront, that I am bound to miss a lot of names here. As we shift our focus to Australia’s indie scene, I will admit that I didn’t quite know where to start, in part because this was my entry point to the country’s music, after over a decade of listening, on and off, to Triple J. The radio station is an important factor in unearthing (yes, that is a pun) a lot of Aussie talent from the underground scenes of the capital cities, and later the whole nation, and bringing them to the forefront, just as these bands began to explore all the new styles coming out of the US and the UK. Outside of the pub rock that the more prominent rock bands of the time were peddling, the influence of punk and its offshoots were moving a lot of bands to directions nobody had imagined before.

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How to collect pop music from down under, part three: the pop course

The history of Australian rock and Australian pop are so intertwined, I had a bit of difficulty figuring out who to put where. That means, yes, I know I did not mention two bands I would typically be mentioning on the rock column – but then, that’s partly down to how I’ve perceived those bands from my perch here in the Philippines, both of which are still staples of retro playlists, or what’s left of them.

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How to collect pop music from down under, part two: the rock course

When the radio station 2JJ launched in 1975, it chose to play, as its first song, Skyhooks’ “You Just Like Me ‘Cos I’m Good In Bed”. It was quite a statement from the get-go: it was banned by most radio stations at the time, due to its controversial lyrics. It was also a statement of support for Australian music, which at the time was woefully underrepresented on the airwaves. Despite musicians following trends in the US and UK, and gaining popularity on the live circuit, it took decades before Aussie pop – in the case of this week’s installment, Aussie rock – could gain critical mass and become the force that it is today.

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