How to collect pop music from down under, part one: the introductory course

I’ve been trying to make sense of Australian music for as long as I’ve been a radio geek. It all started, of course, when I first began listening to Triple J – or at least perusing their website, because I only had dial-up and everything would slow down if I attempted to listen to even the lowest quality stream. Of course, I’ve written a lot about Aussie artists throughout this blog’s history, and it’s interesting how we have this country whose music is a bit of a contradiction: it’s always kept an eye on trends elsewhere in the world, but it’s also done its own thing; it tells its own stories and it presents itself as something anybody and everybody can enjoy.

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The crash course: Everybody calls him Giorgio

Giorgio Moroder's career spans five whole decades.

Kids these days might have heard him first from that nine-minute Daft Punk track. “My name is Giovanni Giorgio,” he began, “but everybody calls me Giorgio.” Thus began the unlikely return of Giorgio Moroder to the pop scene’s cool parts, culminating in the release last year of Déjà Vu, his first album in 23 years. Throughout his fifty-year career the Italian record producer has shaped pop music: coming from the bouncy sensiblities of Italian pop, he was a leading beacon of the disco sound, and later produced many iconic songs. As he performs in Manila on Saturday, 27 February (unless there’s another postponement) here’s an attempt to cover all those five decades – well, there was a break – in five songs.

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